Bill Maclay

Author of The New Net Zero

Ecological design innovator

Founder and Principal, Maclay Architects

Today we live amid one of the most remarkable revolutions in human civilization– the replacement of fossil fuels with renewable energy. We are experiencing a transformational tipping point and a societal change in our energy sources which fuel all aspects of our civilization. This revolution is here–we now are tipping the scales toward a renewable future.

Nationally buildings consume 48% of total energy and carbon. If we take a leap to make our buildings net zero–which means they renewably produce what they consume annually–we can make a significant reduction in our fossil fuel addiction in order to largely solve our carbon emission challenge. Net Zero buildings offer one clear path forward to address 48% of our climate change problem.

Here is the path. Net zero buildings are: The most affordable choice–it is less expensive to power our buildings with renewable energy than with fossil fuels. Easily achievable–we have the technology readily available–nothing new needs inventing. Healthy and beautiful–they create cherished and long-lasting places for people who respect our natural world.

Without this, we are missing the opportunity to do the right thing for our children, our planet, and all living systems–and to be healthier, happier, and save money. How do we get there? Let’s begin a movement forward together. Join with members of your community to share what people are doing locally and brainstorm a path to a renewable future.

Seek out opportunities to support and advocate for this important mission. Look for resources such as, The New Net Zero, where my colleagues and I offer both the vision and “how to” details for achieving a net zero future.

And most importantly–ACT NOW, YOUR CHILDREN AND THE PLANET WILL THANK YOU.

Bill Maclay pictured in the solarium of the George D. Aiken Center–home to the Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources at the University of Vermont–and now a LEED Platinum green building after a 2012 renovation by Maclay’s firm, Maclay Architects.

Bill Maclay pictured in the solarium of the George D. Aiken Center–home to the Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources at the University of Vermont–and now a LEED Platinum green building after a 2012 renovation by Maclay’s firm, Maclay Architects.